Head and eye movements affect object processing in 4-month-old infants more than an artificial orientation cue

Autor(en)
Sebastian Wahl, Christine Michel, Sabina Pauen, Stefanie Hoehl
Abstrakt

This study investigates the effects of attention-guiding stimuli on 4-month-old infants' object processing. In the human head condition, infants saw a person turning her head and eye gaze towards or away from objects. When presented with the objects again, infants showed increased attention in terms of longer looking time measured by eye tracking and an increased Nc amplitude measured by event-related potentials (ERP) for the previously uncued objects versus the cued objects. This suggests that the uncued objects were previously processed less effectively and appeared more novel to the infants. In a second condition, a car instead of a human head turned towards or away from objects. Eye-tracking results did not reveal any significant difference in infants' looking time. ERPs indicated only a marginally significant effect in late slow-wave activity associated with memory encoding for the uncued objects. We conclude that human head orientation and gaze direction affect infants' object-directed attention, whereas movement and orientation of a car have only limited influence on infants' object processing.

Organisation(en)
Externe Organisation(en)
Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Journal
British Journal of Developmental Psychology
Band
31
Seiten
212-30
Anzahl der Seiten
19
ISSN
0261-510X
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1111/bjdp.12001
Publikationsdatum
06-2013
Peer-reviewed
Ja
ÖFOS 2012
501005 Entwicklungspsychologie
Schlagwörter
Link zum Portal
https://ucris.univie.ac.at/portal/de/publications/head-and-eye-movements-affect-object-processing-in-4monthold-infants-more-than-an-artificial-orientation-cue(79c0cfe2-eddc-439a-a682-4b5daed377d1).html